04 12 / 2013

rosalindrobertson:

A while ago, I penned a fairly angry response to something circulating on the internet – the 21 Habits of Happy People. It pissed me off beyond belief, that there was an inference that if you weren’t Happy, you simply weren’t doing the right things.

I’ve had depression for as long as I can…

18 10 / 2013

"

If policemen and doctors would just do their jobs, we wouldn’t have any crime or any death.

Look, I know you cops like hanging out at Dunkin Donuts most of the day. I know you doctors like playing golf every afternoon. But if you want to keep your cushy jobs, you’re going to have to step up and show us some RESULTS to justify your pay.

If a police department has more than three crimes per month committed in its jurisdiction, funding for the department will be cut, and some police officers will have to be fired until the crime rate goes down. If a two or more patients under a doctor’s care die (for any reason) in a single year, fifty-percent of that doctor’s salary will be garnished by the government, and he will risk losing his medical license if the survival rates do not improve.

Now, I already hear you complaining. “I’m a police officer in a dangerous area. We risk our lives each day, and we can’t afford to lose funding or manpower.” Or, “I’m a doctor who specializes in treating cancer patients and the elderly. I work as hard as I can to keep them alive against incredible odds.”

Well, guess what? Nobody forced you to become a police officer or a doctor. Get with the program, or get out of the field.

"

What If We Spoke to Police Officers and Doctors the Way We Speak to Teachers?  (via edukaition)

(Source: valeria2067, via girlwithalessonplan)

18 10 / 2013

theyuniversity:

image

Here is the difference between “affect” and “effect”:

imageimageimage

We hope you will never be confused about “affect” and “effect” again.

image

Cheers.

15 10 / 2013

theyuniversity:

imageimageimageimageimage

Lie down, lay your head on a bed of leaves, and go to sleep, homie.

image

05 2 / 2013

thepeoplesrecord:

The new Jane Crow: How hundreds of pregnant women have had their rights violated & health put in jeopardy as part of the war on choiceFebruary 4, 2013
Regina McKnight was 21 years old when she was convicted and sentenced to 12 years in prison for homicide by child abuse—after she suffered a stillbirth eight-and-a-half months into her pregnancy.
The jury deliberated only 15 minutes before finding McKnight guilty of having committed “child abuse”—because of using cocaine during her pregnancy. She went to jail, and one appeals court after another upheld the conviction—until it was finally overturned eight years later on the grounds that the scientific evidence used to claim McKnight’s drug use was responsible for the stillbirth was “outdated” at the time of her trial.
Laura Pemberton was arrested while she was in active labor—for attempting to give birth at home, rather than undergo a C-section advised by her doctor. A sheriff strapped her legs together and took her to the hospital, where, at an emergency hearing, lawyers argued on behalf of her fetus. Pemberton and her husband were denied counsel during this hearing, though they were “allowed to express their views” as hospital staff prepared Pemberton for surgery.
These stories aren’t scenes out of some horror movie about a nightmarish future society. They are real-life accounts from the war on women and their rights that has been underway since the Roe v. Wade Supreme Court decision that legalized abortion in 1973.
In a new report titled “Arrests of and Forced Interventions on Pregnant Women in the United States, 1973–2005,” the National Advocates for Pregnant Women (NAPW) summarizes the experiences of 413 women who have been subjected to cruel punishments or unwanted medical procedures while they were pregnant.
No state or federal law permits the arrest or detention of women specifically due to pregnancy. Yet hundreds of pregnant women—predominantly low-income women and women of color—have had their rights taken away and their health put in jeopardy because police, prosecutors, judges and even medical personnel have claimed the authority to determine what will happen to their bodies. Lynn Paltrow, one of the authors of the NAPW study, calls this phenomenon “a new Jane Crow”—in reference to author Michelle Alexander’s best-selling examination of the mass incarceration system.
The crusade against women’s reproductive rights has been led by politicians and organizations which claim to cherish the “right to life” and champion women’s role as mothers. But the reality made painfully clear by the NAPW’s report is that the anti-choice right wants women to be treated as second-class citizens, denied the right to health care, personal liberty and the right to control their own bodies and lives.
Report authors Lynn Paltrow and Jeanne Flavin say their study understates the number of incidents of incarceration or forced medical intervention against pregnant women in the decades following Roe.
No one has attempted to compile these stories before, and records of the cases are either scattered among different sources or nonexistent altogether. Often, say Paltrow and Flavin, hospital staff impose unwanted procedures without the involvement of state authorities. Plus, the decisions of family and juvenile courts are kept confidential. So the number of victims is likely to be many times greater than the 413 cases verified by the NAPW in its rigorous study.
Nonetheless, the patterns of punishment described in the report paint a frightening picture of the consequences of the right’s campaign against reproductive freedom.
- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
What “crimes” were committed by the pregnant women whose stories are told in the NAPW report?
In the cases the report documents, women were most often targeted not for attempting to end a pregnancy, but for attempting to carry one to term. The main reason for arrest and detention was drug use during pregnancy, but in other cases, women were punished because they suffered from sexually transmitted diseases or mental illness while pregnant. Others wanted to deliver at home, refused C-sections or failed to access prenatal care.
In several cases, women were charged with one or more felonies after they suffered a miscarriage or attempted to end a pregnancy on their own. And in one case, state prosecutors used the fact that a woman had refused an offer of sterilization in support of its charges. This case, in particular, strikes an old and deep wound, following decades of forced sterilizations of Black, Latina, Native American and immigrant women.
In all, just over half of the women whose stories are collected in the report are Black. Nearly three quarters of those facing legal charges were represented by indigent defense.
African American women have suffered a long legacy of barbaric discrimination—from the separation of families under slavery to the early 20th century eugenics movement that pushed through laws in 32 states allowing the sterilization of women judged “unfit to breed.”
Today, poor Black single mothers are scapegoated for all manner of social problems. In particular, the war on drugs has served as a vehicle for the attack, with drug convictions serving as the excuse for terminating parental rights of incarcerated mothers.
Meanwhile, the media have whipped up a moral panic over drug use during pregnancy. Thus, cocaine was the drug most often associated with the criminal charges against pregnant women documented in the NAPW report. But health professionals now recognize that cocaine use during pregnancy poses no more significant risk to fetal health than poor nutrition, lack of prenatal care or other factors commonly suffered by the poor.
In fact, in most of the cases documented in the report, authorities didn’t claim that fetuses had been harmed, only that there was a risk of harm. And even when actual harm was alleged, in most cases, there was no scientific evidence or expert testimony to substantiate the claim.
For example, Geralynn Susan Grubbs, a 23-year-old woman in Alaska, was threatened with 30 years imprisonment and therefore pled guilty to a lesser charge of criminally negligent homicide in connection with the death of her two-week-old infant. Prosecutors claimed that drug use during pregnancy had caused the infant’s death—this allegation was allowed to stand even after an autopsy revealed that there was no connection between the death of the child and fetal drug exposure.
Such punishment flies in the face of the recommendations of the medical community. Organizations like the American Medical Association have concluded that criminalizing drug use by pregnant women only discourages women from seeking prenatal care and assistance with their addiction.
Nonetheless, Paltrow and Flavin document how threats of arrest or loss of custody lead some pregnant women with drug problems to avoid medical attention, prenatal care and hospital deliveries altogether. In one particularly absurd case, 34-year-old Alma Baker was prosecuted for dealing drugs to a minor—after she gave birth to twins who tested positive for THC, a chemical found in marijuana. Baker stated that if she realized the risk of criminal charges, she would not have gone to her doctor at all.
Alma Baker is white, which makes her case highly unusual among those documented in the NAPW report. Women of all races use drugs at rates roughly equivalent to their numbers in the overall population—yet overwhelmingly those questioned, screened and punished for drug use related to pregnancy were African American.
Full article

thepeoplesrecord:

The new Jane Crow: How hundreds of pregnant women have had their rights violated & health put in jeopardy as part of the war on choice
February 4, 2013

Regina McKnight was 21 years old when she was convicted and sentenced to 12 years in prison for homicide by child abuse—after she suffered a stillbirth eight-and-a-half months into her pregnancy.

The jury deliberated only 15 minutes before finding McKnight guilty of having committed “child abuse”—because of using cocaine during her pregnancy. She went to jail, and one appeals court after another upheld the conviction—until it was finally overturned eight years later on the grounds that the scientific evidence used to claim McKnight’s drug use was responsible for the stillbirth was “outdated” at the time of her trial.

Laura Pemberton was arrested while she was in active labor—for attempting to give birth at home, rather than undergo a C-section advised by her doctor. A sheriff strapped her legs together and took her to the hospital, where, at an emergency hearing, lawyers argued on behalf of her fetus. Pemberton and her husband were denied counsel during this hearing, though they were “allowed to express their views” as hospital staff prepared Pemberton for surgery.

These stories aren’t scenes out of some horror movie about a nightmarish future society. They are real-life accounts from the war on women and their rights that has been underway since the Roe v. Wade Supreme Court decision that legalized abortion in 1973.

In a new report titled “Arrests of and Forced Interventions on Pregnant Women in the United States, 1973–2005,” the National Advocates for Pregnant Women (NAPW) summarizes the experiences of 413 women who have been subjected to cruel punishments or unwanted medical procedures while they were pregnant.

No state or federal law permits the arrest or detention of women specifically due to pregnancy. Yet hundreds of pregnant women—predominantly low-income women and women of color—have had their rights taken away and their health put in jeopardy because police, prosecutors, judges and even medical personnel have claimed the authority to determine what will happen to their bodies. Lynn Paltrow, one of the authors of the NAPW study, calls this phenomenon “a new Jane Crow”—in reference to author Michelle Alexander’s best-selling examination of the mass incarceration system.

The crusade against women’s reproductive rights has been led by politicians and organizations which claim to cherish the “right to life” and champion women’s role as mothers. But the reality made painfully clear by the NAPW’s report is that the anti-choice right wants women to be treated as second-class citizens, denied the right to health care, personal liberty and the right to control their own bodies and lives.

Report authors Lynn Paltrow and Jeanne Flavin say their study understates the number of incidents of incarceration or forced medical intervention against pregnant women in the decades following Roe.

No one has attempted to compile these stories before, and records of the cases are either scattered among different sources or nonexistent altogether. Often, say Paltrow and Flavin, hospital staff impose unwanted procedures without the involvement of state authorities. Plus, the decisions of family and juvenile courts are kept confidential. So the number of victims is likely to be many times greater than the 413 cases verified by the NAPW in its rigorous study.

Nonetheless, the patterns of punishment described in the report paint a frightening picture of the consequences of the right’s campaign against reproductive freedom.

- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

What “crimes” were committed by the pregnant women whose stories are told in the NAPW report?

In the cases the report documents, women were most often targeted not for attempting to end a pregnancy, but for attempting to carry one to term. The main reason for arrest and detention was drug use during pregnancy, but in other cases, women were punished because they suffered from sexually transmitted diseases or mental illness while pregnant. Others wanted to deliver at home, refused C-sections or failed to access prenatal care.

In several cases, women were charged with one or more felonies after they suffered a miscarriage or attempted to end a pregnancy on their own. And in one case, state prosecutors used the fact that a woman had refused an offer of sterilization in support of its charges. This case, in particular, strikes an old and deep wound, following decades of forced sterilizations of Black, Latina, Native American and immigrant women.

In all, just over half of the women whose stories are collected in the report are Black. Nearly three quarters of those facing legal charges were represented by indigent defense.

African American women have suffered a long legacy of barbaric discrimination—from the separation of families under slavery to the early 20th century eugenics movement that pushed through laws in 32 states allowing the sterilization of women judged “unfit to breed.”

Today, poor Black single mothers are scapegoated for all manner of social problems. In particular, the war on drugs has served as a vehicle for the attack, with drug convictions serving as the excuse for terminating parental rights of incarcerated mothers.

Meanwhile, the media have whipped up a moral panic over drug use during pregnancy. Thus, cocaine was the drug most often associated with the criminal charges against pregnant women documented in the NAPW report. But health professionals now recognize that cocaine use during pregnancy poses no more significant risk to fetal health than poor nutrition, lack of prenatal care or other factors commonly suffered by the poor.

In fact, in most of the cases documented in the report, authorities didn’t claim that fetuses had been harmed, only that there was a risk of harm. And even when actual harm was alleged, in most cases, there was no scientific evidence or expert testimony to substantiate the claim.

For example, Geralynn Susan Grubbs, a 23-year-old woman in Alaska, was threatened with 30 years imprisonment and therefore pled guilty to a lesser charge of criminally negligent homicide in connection with the death of her two-week-old infant. Prosecutors claimed that drug use during pregnancy had caused the infant’s death—this allegation was allowed to stand even after an autopsy revealed that there was no connection between the death of the child and fetal drug exposure.

Such punishment flies in the face of the recommendations of the medical community. Organizations like the American Medical Association have concluded that criminalizing drug use by pregnant women only discourages women from seeking prenatal care and assistance with their addiction.

Nonetheless, Paltrow and Flavin document how threats of arrest or loss of custody lead some pregnant women with drug problems to avoid medical attention, prenatal care and hospital deliveries altogether. In one particularly absurd case, 34-year-old Alma Baker was prosecuted for dealing drugs to a minor—after she gave birth to twins who tested positive for THC, a chemical found in marijuana. Baker stated that if she realized the risk of criminal charges, she would not have gone to her doctor at all.

Alma Baker is white, which makes her case highly unusual among those documented in the NAPW report. Women of all races use drugs at rates roughly equivalent to their numbers in the overall population—yet overwhelmingly those questioned, screened and punished for drug use related to pregnancy were African American.

Full article

(via wilwheaton)

02 10 / 2012

neurosciencestuff:

A new font tailored for people afflicted with dyslexia is now available for use on mobile devices, thanks to a design by Abelardo Gonzalez, a mobile app designer from New Hampshire. Gonzalez, in collaboration with educators, has selected a font that many people with dyslexia find easier to read. Even better, the new font is free and has already been made available for some word processors and ebook readers. The font, called OpenDyslexic, has also been added to the font choices used by Instapaper—a program that allows users to copy a web page and save it to their hard drive.

This is SO COOL. Special Ed teachers, take note!!

neurosciencestuff:

A new font tailored for people afflicted with dyslexia is now available for use on mobile devices, thanks to a design by Abelardo Gonzalez, a mobile app designer from New Hampshire. Gonzalez, in collaboration with educators, has selected a font that many people with dyslexia find easier to read. Even better, the new font is free and has already been made available for some word processors and ebook readers. The font, called OpenDyslexic, has also been added to the font choices used by Instapaper—a program that allows users to copy a web page and save it to their hard drive.

This is SO COOL. Special Ed teachers, take note!!

20 7 / 2012

thefrogman:

(rebloggable by request)
This is a very common opinion. It’s a bad interpretation of bad weight loss marketing. A 40 billion dollar weight loss industry is certainly going to try and convince you being fat is the worst thing ever.
It’s not.
In fact, I can think of a million things worse than being fat.
Like having really short arms and an insatiable need to masturbate.
Having fifty nipples… all on your face.
Getting 10,000 spoons, when all you need is a knife. 
And so on.
Health is very complicated. Being overweight can increase certain health risks… but that is only one variable in a very large health puzzle. It is possible to be fat and healthy. Ernest Borgnine just died at the ripe old age of 95. He was fat all of his life.
My best friend was trim and fit… he died at 24. 
Fat people are not any more lazy than skinny people. I have known plenty of useless skinny folks. And I know my father is one of the hardest working people on this planet, despite the extra pounds.
Fat people don’t disregard healthy diets or exercise tips. Many of them try every diet they can find. They get gym memberships. They get workout tapes and gadgets. But despite considerable effort, they are unable to keep the weight off. It is much much much harder for a fat person to lose weight than it is for a skinny person to remain skinny. I believe 2 in 1000 diets are successful. Some fat people have a better chance of being eaten by a shark. 
I remember when I was on a very strict diet. I was losing weight. Things were looking up. But the hunger was nearly unbearable. It hurt. It was physically painful. If I ate enough to appease the hunger, I would not lose any weight. In fact, if I messed up even a tiny bit on my diet, I would gain weight back. Have you ever done anything without making any mistakes? Yet skinny folks always say, “They should just eat right and exercise” like it is the easiest thing in the world. It’s like walking up to Sisyphus and saying, “That boulder doesn’t look very heavy.” 
All of that said… here is the part where you pissed me off.
“If an obese person is told that they are fat…”
I’m going to let you in on a little secret.
OBESE PEOPLE KNOW THEY ARE FAT AND DO NOT NEED TO BE TOLD. 
Not once will you tell someone they are fat and they will respond, “Holy shit, you’re right!” Telling someone they are fat is shaming. It is bullying. It is never helpful. You are not going to improve their health and you might even make it worse. Being fat might shorten your lifespan, but being depressed will make the years you have really suck. 
Ultimately, fat people must solve the health puzzle on their own. People butting into that process are just rude. The body will usually tell you when something is wrong. A trusted doctor can tell you if your weight is an issue and if action should be taken. But even if that person is unable to reach the perfect picture of health… that’s okay. A truly healthy person is incredibly rare. Fat people still have a life to live and they are worthy of seeking contentment. If people stopped being jerks, that would be a lot easier. 

A-FUCKING-MEN!!!!!!

thefrogman:

(rebloggable by request)

This is a very common opinion. It’s a bad interpretation of bad weight loss marketing. A 40 billion dollar weight loss industry is certainly going to try and convince you being fat is the worst thing ever.

It’s not.

In fact, I can think of a million things worse than being fat.

Like having really short arms and an insatiable need to masturbate.

Having fifty nipples… all on your face.

Getting 10,000 spoons, when all you need is a knife. 

And so on.

Health is very complicated. Being overweight can increase certain health risks… but that is only one variable in a very large health puzzle. It is possible to be fat and healthy. Ernest Borgnine just died at the ripe old age of 95. He was fat all of his life.

My best friend was trim and fit… he died at 24. 

Fat people are not any more lazy than skinny people. I have known plenty of useless skinny folks. And I know my father is one of the hardest working people on this planet, despite the extra pounds.

Fat people don’t disregard healthy diets or exercise tips. Many of them try every diet they can find. They get gym memberships. They get workout tapes and gadgets. But despite considerable effort, they are unable to keep the weight off. It is much much much harder for a fat person to lose weight than it is for a skinny person to remain skinny. I believe 2 in 1000 diets are successful. Some fat people have a better chance of being eaten by a shark. 

I remember when I was on a very strict diet. I was losing weight. Things were looking up. But the hunger was nearly unbearable. It hurt. It was physically painful. If I ate enough to appease the hunger, I would not lose any weight. In fact, if I messed up even a tiny bit on my diet, I would gain weight back. Have you ever done anything without making any mistakes? Yet skinny folks always say, “They should just eat right and exercise” like it is the easiest thing in the world. It’s like walking up to Sisyphus and saying, “That boulder doesn’t look very heavy.” 

All of that said… here is the part where you pissed me off.

“If an obese person is told that they are fat…”

I’m going to let you in on a little secret.

OBESE PEOPLE KNOW THEY ARE FAT AND DO NOT NEED TO BE TOLD.

Not once will you tell someone they are fat and they will respond, “Holy shit, you’re right!” Telling someone they are fat is shaming. It is bullying. It is never helpful. You are not going to improve their health and you might even make it worse. Being fat might shorten your lifespan, but being depressed will make the years you have really suck. 

Ultimately, fat people must solve the health puzzle on their own. People butting into that process are just rude. The body will usually tell you when something is wrong. A trusted doctor can tell you if your weight is an issue and if action should be taken. But even if that person is unable to reach the perfect picture of health… that’s okay. A truly healthy person is incredibly rare. Fat people still have a life to live and they are worthy of seeking contentment. If people stopped being jerks, that would be a lot easier. 

A-FUCKING-MEN!!!!!!